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Thread: Please help :'(

  1. #1
    Member Freshman Geckos4Life<3's Avatar
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    Default Please help :'(

    I was just feeding my cave geckos there and when I opened the tub one had a quarter of a tail left :'( she's dropped her tail!! Never happened to me before and it wasn't my fault! :'(

    They are on coco earth brick do should I separate her and put her on damp paper towel (to keep humidity up) as I dont want it to get infected!

    One more thing... I can't find the dropped tail.... Did one of them eat it?? :'(

    So sad :'(


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  2. #2
    Member Freshman Geckos4Life<3's Avatar
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    Please someone help me and my poor baby :'(


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  3. #3
    Sophisticated Ignorance Freshman
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    Autotomized tails are a natural escape mechanism to help the lizard free themselves from predators in the wild, so they are not likely to get infected. That being said you should still take some precautionary steps.

    Your first instinct was correct, you should seperate the gecko and keep it on a sterile substrate until the wound closes up. If you'd like, you can apply a SMALL amount of neosporin to help prevent infection, but this probably won't be needed.

    This could be a sign of bullying from the other geckos, as they normally bite tails in an attempt to dominate or drive the weaker gecko away from hide spots, food dishes, etc. You should consider permanently seperating them.
    Last edited by LaurenceH; 03-07-2012 at 04:24 PM.
    Laurence Hardy

  4. #4
    Member Freshman Geckos4Life<3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaurenceH View Post
    Autotomized tails are a natural escape mechanism to help the lizard free themselves from predators in the wild, so they are not likely to get infected. That being said you should still take some precautionary steps.

    Your first instinct was correct, you should seperate the gecko and keep it on a sterile substrate until the wound closes up. If you'd like, you can apply a SMALL amount of neosporin to help prevent infection, but this probably won't be needed.

    This could be a sign of bullying from the other geckos, as they normally bite tails in an attempt to dominate or drive the weaker gecko away from hide spots, food dishes, etc. You should consider permanently seperating them.
    Thank you you have put my mind at rest about the infection part. I really appreciate it and I will consider it as I hate seeing animals get hurt/bullied




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