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Thread: Any Advice?

  1. #11
    African Fat Tails <3 Freshman geckobabies's Avatar
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    A few general comments that may or may not help you. I don't know the background on your gecko or how long you've had it but maybe this will help.

    In general, fat tails are very shy. Removing them to another container is not the best idea. It works for some, I would guess the majority it does not. If it's not eating, it could be because winter is here and they can go off feed during that time, it could be the tank is not warm enough, it could be it's stressed and unhappy, or it could be parasites.

    From looking at your gecko from that photo it looks skinny to me. If it's an import, my guess is parasites. If it will eat mealworms out of your hand, feed it about 10 mealies a day everyday to get it to gain some weight. If it starts eating well but does not gain weight it's probably because of parasites. Fecals are around $25 and a good idea if you have not had one.

    I cannot comment on planted tanks, as I have never had one.. but fat tails are nocturnal animals they do not like light. A bright UVB bulb is only a disadvantage for your fat tail. They need a warm side moist hide more so than a cool side. The warm side moist hide provides shelter, comfort and humidity. I prefer New England Sphagnum moss for my hides for juvies and adults. I juse plastic containers with a hold cut in the lid. Simple, yet effective and easy to clean and sanitize.

    Hope some of that helped. good luck with your gecko, I hope it turns around for you.
    Jessica Smith ~ GeckoBabies.com ~ Facebook
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  2. #12
    Member Freshman Stripe's Avatar
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    I've had her for about four or five years now, but I'm pretty sure she was an import. I'm guessing parasites are still possible? She has a heat pad under the left side of her tank and an overhead plant light that doesn't generate much heat. It's on a timer and turns on at 9AM, off at 6PM. I'll be switching her to Eco-Earth Tuesday or Wednesday, depending on when I have time. I also plan to get her a few more plants. (By the way, any plant suggestions? She has two pothos right now and I'm ordering two boxes of pillow moss.) I'll try to get/make a warm moist hide soon.
    Last edited by Stripe; 02-15-2014 at 02:14 PM.
    Proud caretaker of: one AFT (Stripe), one Northern BTS, two fire-bellied newts, a clawed frog, a black-necked garter snake, one PP hermit crab, five swordtails, two cats, and a labrador retriever!

  3. #13
    Member Freshman Stripe's Avatar
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    Well, she's been eating 9-10 mealworms daily, and seems a bit more plump. I didn't feed her yesterday however, because she was still getting used to her new surroundings. I decided to skip the layer of hydro balls. At the moment, there are 3 inches of Eco-earth on the warm side, and 4 on the cool side. Both sides slope down to the middle. Her warm hide is partially buried in the soil. I left a food dish next to it so that I can feed her without soil getting in the way. There are a few small pothos scattered throughout the back of the tank, and I was thinking about adding two small bromeliads. On the cool side I've buried the bottom half of the cool hide, and covered the surface of the substrate in pillow moss. Her water dish is almost hanging off of the slope of the soil, so I might add more there. I'll upload more pictures when I get home, but does anyone have any suggestions?
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    Last edited by Stripe; 02-19-2014 at 12:26 PM.
    Proud caretaker of: one AFT (Stripe), one Northern BTS, two fire-bellied newts, a clawed frog, a black-necked garter snake, one PP hermit crab, five swordtails, two cats, and a labrador retriever!

  4. #14
    Biologist & Ecologist Freshman Olympus's Avatar
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    I like it. I think it was a good idea to forgo the hydroballs, if your tank was wet enough to need them I think your gecko would be in trouble! Pothos need very little water so spot-watering them and then misting the tank down like usual will be enough to keep everything alive but not spike the humidity to sky-high levels perpetually.
    1.2 Meller's Chameleons | 1.2 African Fat Tailed Geckos
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  5. #15
    African Fat Tails <3 Freshman geckobabies's Avatar
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    Glad to hear she is eating Having no experience with this type of setup, my only suggestion would be to make sure she has a warm dry area as well as moist. They are not a tropical species and need dry areas to get away from the humidity and moisture.
    Jessica Smith ~ GeckoBabies.com ~ Facebook
    Fat Tail Geckos ~ Leopard Geckos ~ Western Hognose Snakes

  6. #16
    Member Freshman Stripe's Avatar
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    Well, I haven't seen her out very much since I changed her setup. I've been attempting to feed her mealworms but she hasn't taken many, and never leaves her hide while feeding, which make things difficult. I left a few small crickets in there but I have no idea if she'll eat them. Ideas..?

    Also, here are a few more pictures of the setup. I added a small bromeliad and a baby ponytail palm.
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    Proud caretaker of: one AFT (Stripe), one Northern BTS, two fire-bellied newts, a clawed frog, a black-necked garter snake, one PP hermit crab, five swordtails, two cats, and a labrador retriever!

  7. #17
    Member Freshman Stripe's Avatar
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    You know, I probably should have mentioned this earlier. I realize that this is probably a TERRIBLE thing to do, but here goes. For the past... 5(?) years, until recently, Stripe has been eating baby food out of a syringe with a rubber nipple. He ate primarily chicken or turkey baby food, with a bit of squash or sweet potato food mixed in. Calcium and Herptivite multivitamins were added, along with electrolyte powder (Store) on occasion.

    The reason I'm writing this is that she's still pretty used to being hand-fed via syringe. In fact, when I first started her on mealworms, her aim was so bad that each worm took multiple attempts to eat. Has anyone ever heard of others syringe-feeding their geckos? Exactly how bad was feeding baby food? Also, once again, any feeding advice?

    EDIT: Just curious- how dangerous would it be for a gecko to ingest dirt or coconut fiber?
    Last edited by Stripe; 02-28-2014 at 12:37 AM.

  8. #18
    Member Freshman Stripe's Avatar
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    She's been eating dusted mealworms every other day now. I take her out of her cage and set them in front of her. I've also been attempting to give her baths in about a centimeter of water. (She's got a bit of shed skin on her foot that won't come off.) Anyone have something to say with regard to the last post?
    Proud caretaker of: one AFT (Stripe), one Northern BTS, two fire-bellied newts, a clawed frog, a black-necked garter snake, one PP hermit crab, five swordtails, two cats, and a labrador retriever!

  9. #19
    Biologist & Ecologist Freshman Olympus's Avatar
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    Baby food isn't great for these guys but she looks good so you're in time to correct any issues, like too much animal protein causing gout in her joints, for example.

    And as far as substrate, you'll hear different answers from different people but in 15 years of keeping or working professionally with reptiles I have yet to see any issues in a healthy animal. Healthy meaning well-hydrated, no MBD, and no debilitating weakness or disease.

    However, you see it a lot in animals that have these conditions, because they physically can't move things along, regardless of how loose or particulate.
    1.2 Meller's Chameleons | 1.2 African Fat Tailed Geckos
    My Reptile Blog, Much Ado About Chameleons

  10. #20
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    In regards to the post about feeding the baby food, I would book a check up at the reptile vets just to see if she could be malnourished from eating the baby food. Sorry if you have already answered this in a previous post and I missed it. Hope all goes well anyway. Gary

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