Gargoyle Gecko Help?

Abedewla

New Member
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Dubai
Hey everyone, this is my first thread on this site so forgive me if I posted this in the wrong section.

I've visited a pet store yesterday which had the three (two female and one male) Gargoyle Geckos for sale pictured below. The light grey female seems to have a scar on the top of her head (possibly from fighting with her two other cage mates?) The employee told me she is between 8-9 months.

And the other (pictured running on top of the male) seems to have developed MBD? As I noticed she has a slightly kinked spine by the looks of it but if someone with more experience on the matter could clarify this that would be great.

They unfortunately have been feeding them an incomplete diet solely based on calcium dusted crickets from what the employee tells me, but thankfully they state they've only had them for two weeks. I saw them yesterday and plan on going back today to pick them up, as I couldn't stop worrying about them since I first saw them.

My question is:

How can I possibly help these two heal to live long healthy lives? What remedies can I use to help heal the light grey females scar, if any? I'm aware MBD is permanent and cannot be fully cured if this is the case, and will surely take her to a vet.

(Note: I am familiar with the standard housing/diet requirements of these geckos and have everything arranged for them.)

Any assistance on the matter is greatly appreciated!
 

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acpart

Geck-cessories
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Welcome to GF! Yes, you did post in the right place. The female's scar, from what you say and what I observe is just that, a scar. The wound is healed and there's nothing more you need to do. I agree that the orange striped one has MBD and that it can't be reversed. The proper diet will improve its health, stopping but not reversing the MBD. The best thing you can do for these geckos is to plan to house them separately. In general, gargoyle geckos tend to be aggressive and are frequently housed separately. I must confess that I have 1.3 sharing a large enclosure, but I'm always on the lookout for any signs of aggression and have backup cages in case someone needs to be separated. It's happened twice in the last 5 years.

Aliza
 
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