Help with matching pair of geckos

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
Hello,
I would really appretiate with you all could help me to see if these two would made a good pair.
Unfortunelly I don't have all the background on them.

The male came as a bell (but I think tremper) albino.

20240225_234553.jpg
20240225_234514.jpg
20240225_234638.jpg
20240225_234615.jpg

The female is for sale and is said to be a tremper het mack snow.
IMG-20240225-WA0029.jpg
IMG-20240225-WA0028(1).jpg
IMG-20240225-WA0022.jpg
IMG-20240225-WA0024.jpg
IMG-20240225-WA0025.jpg
Thanks for all the advice and help. Big hugs from Brazil.

Dominique
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
15,190
Location
Somerville, MA
Welcome to GF. Mack snow is co-dominant, so a gecko can't be "het" for Mack snow. If it has 1 gene for Mack snow it will be a Mack snow. If it has 2 genes for Mack snow it will be a super snow. If it has a parent who is Mack snow and it hatches out black and yellow (as opposed to black and white), then it has no genes for Mack snow and no possibility of passing that trait on to another gecko.

I agree that the male does look more like a Tremper than a Bell. On the other hand, it could be a Las Vegas/Rainwater. It's generally frowned upon to breed geckos together where the breeder isn't sure of their genetics because the result is offspring without a known genetic history. This is especially a problem if 2 different strains of albino are bred together because ultimately it will be impossible to know which albino gene(s) they possess. It's not illegal, nor is it unhealthy for the gecko, but it will mean that a reputable breeder will not want to buy that gecko and it's not doing any favors for the hobby.

In my opinion, the most responsible thing to do if you want to breed would be:
--keep your male as a pet and get a male of known genetics to breed to your female
--make sure you are familiar with basic leopard gecko genetics and that you understand terms such as: dominant, recessive, co-dominant, heterozygous, homozygous, line bred (I'm not saying you don't, but the "het for Mack snow" made me wonder a bit).

We are happy to answer any questions about this you may have.

Aliza
 

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
Welcome to GF. Mack snow is co-dominant, so a gecko can't be "het" for Mack snow. If it has 1 gene for Mack snow it will be a Mack snow. If it has 2 genes for Mack snow it will be a super snow. If it has a parent who is Mack snow and it hatches out black and yellow (as opposed to black and white), then it has no genes for Mack snow and no possibility of passing that trait on to another gecko.

I agree that the male does look more like a Tremper than a Bell. On the other hand, it could be a Las Vegas/Rainwater. It's generally frowned upon to breed geckos together where the breeder isn't sure of their genetics because the result is offspring without a known genetic history. This is especially a problem if 2 different strains of albino are bred together because ultimately it will be impossible to know which albino gene(s) they possess. It's not illegal, nor is it unhealthy for the gecko, but it will mean that a reputable breeder will not want to buy that gecko and it's not doing any favors for the hobby.

In my opinion, the most responsible thing to do if you want to breed would be:
--keep your male as a pet and get a male of known genetics to breed to your female
--make sure you are familiar with basic leopard gecko genetics and that you understand terms such as: dominant, recessive, co-dominant, heterozygous, homozygous, line bred (I'm not saying you don't, but the "het for Mack snow" made me wonder a bit).

We are happy to answer any questions about this you may have.

Aliza
 

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
Thanks Aliza. I still get confused with the genetics, but in this specific case a thought was not a big problem to breed as the male seems albino and female don't (I think her eyes are a tell for her not to be albino). As I'm in Brazil we have very little morfology of geckos on the country, most are wild type, tremper, blizzard, mack snow, wy, patternless; we don't have good tangerines, Black nights, joker, clows, devils, and I never seen a recognozible bell or rainwater.

I think might be a good option to get the tremper female and test her with my wild morf. male.

We would have this pair...

IMG-20240225-WA0029.jpg

And male....

20220806_140012.jpg 20220806_140022.jpg
 

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
What do you think would be the best morfology to test this female tremper tremper? To check if she is het for any other morfology?
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
15,190
Location
Somerville, MA
The female in your first post is an albino because she's yellow and beige instead of yellow and black. The way to test for Mack snow is to breed her to a male that isn't snow and see if you get any snow offspring (or to breed her to a male that is a snow and see if you get any super snows). If you breed 2 geckos you think are Tremper to each other and you don't get albinos, you'll know that the 2 parents are different albino strains. Otherwise, if you want to know what other morphs your gecko has genes for, you'd have to breed it to a gecko that definitely has that morph and see if you get any offspring that display that morph.

Aliza
 

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
The female in your first post is an albino because she's yellow and beige instead of yellow and black. The way to test for Mack snow is to breed her to a male that isn't snow and see if you get any snow offspring (or to breed her to a male that is a snow and see if you get any super snows). If you breed 2 geckos you think are Tremper to each other and you don't get albinos, you'll know that the 2 parents are different albino strains. Otherwise, if you want to know what other morphs your gecko has genes for, you'd have to breed it to a gecko that definitely has that morph and see if you get any offspring that display that morph.

Aliza
Hi Aliza,

I have a question, sorry to bother with trivial stuff... The female (photo bellow) has black pupils and the side of the eyes look more light colored. Is the eyes the only way to prove fenotipclly (sorry if the word is write wrong, 6 am here) that she is an complete albino rr (recessive recessive)? Or because of the eyes blackned she could be a het for albino?
IMG-20240225-WA0028(1).jpg IMG-20240225-WA0025.jpg
 

domidinis

New Member
Messages
6
The female in your first post is an albino because she's yellow and beige instead of yellow and black. The way to test for Mack snow is to breed her to a male that isn't snow and see if you get any snow offspring (or to breed her to a male that is a snow and see if you get any super snows). If you breed 2 geckos you think are Tremper to each other and you don't get albinos, you'll know that the 2 parents are different albino strains. Otherwise, if you want to know what other morphs your gecko has genes for, you'd have to breed it to a gecko that definitely has that morph and see if you get any offspring that display that morph.

Aliza
Beside that I have that one wild male.... but I have one I think might be a super snow or mack snow, could help me identify how I can check if one or another? He is paired with a blizzard midnight.

20220806_135354.jpg 20220806_135351.jpg
20220806_135351.jpg
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
15,190
Location
Somerville, MA
The female is an albino. Most albino geckos have eyes like hers. If a gecko has the eclipse gene, they will have solid colored eyes (like your male who is, in fact, a super snow). Non-albino geckos who have the eclipse gene have solid black eyes and albino geckos who have the eclipse gene have solid red eyes, though sometimes they may look very dark and seem black. The super snow probably doesn't have the eclipse gene; the solid eyes go along with super snow. Some of his offspring with the blizzard will be snow, but unless the blizzard is also a snow, you wont' get any super snows. Feel free to keep asking questions!

Aliza
 

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