Light that produces a little heat and UV also

geckomindy

New Member
Messages
6
I am new to leopard gecko care. We have a small reptile heater on the side of our tank. It keeps the “hot zone” around 70-73 degrees F. I read that leopard geckos also need a light that emits UV (not sure it’s its UVA or UVB). Does anyone know of a light that does both? A light that produces a little bit of heat (nothing too extreme since we have the reptile heating pad), and that also provides the gecko with the UV it needs for Vitamin d and calcium absorption? It seems everything I’m finding is one or the other, not both. Preferably something that is easy to use, maybe 24/7 so I don’t forget to turn it on and off, and a color that doesn’t disrupt their circadian rhythm. Thank you!
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
11,268
Location
Somerville, MA
Generally leopard geckos are provided with their calcium needs through supplements --calcium and vitamin D3. In the wild, they are crepuscular, which means they tend to come out and bask at dawn and dusk. In captivity, some of them spend all the daylight hours in their hides so the lights don't do much good. Zoomed does make some compact fluorescents that are full spectrum UV, you just have to check the box, but if you supplement properly you don't really need the lights. If you do choose to use one, get a simple timer and you won't have to remember to turn the lights on and off. Hopefully the 70-73 degree hot zone is air temperature measurement. The floor should be in the low 90's and needs to be checked with a thermometer with a probe. This is why most people put the heat under the bottom of the enclosure.

Aliza
 

indyana

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,317
Location
Massachusetts, United States
There are not UV bulbs that don't also produce visible light at this point, so Aliza's rec for a timer is spot on. I personally use Exo Terra UVB 100 13 W bulbs, just about the lowest level you can find that's still useful, and my geckos love to bask at dawn and dusk.

The only UVB bulbs that also produce heat are very powerful and bright sun bulbs, not suitable for leopard geckos in most enclosures.
 

geckomindy

New Member
Messages
6
There are not UV bulbs that don't also produce visible light at this point, so Aliza's rec for a timer is spot on. I personally use Exo Terra UVB 100 13 W bulbs, just about the lowest level you can find that's still useful, and my geckos love to bask at dawn and dusk.

The only UVB bulbs that also produce heat are very powerful and bright sun bulbs, not suitable for leopard geckos in most enclosures.
Ok great, Indyana, do you use a timer? If so what times do you turn on and off the light?
 

geckomindy

New Member
Messages
6
Generally leopard geckos are provided with their calcium needs through supplements --calcium and vitamin D3. In the wild, they are crepuscular, which means they tend to come out and bask at dawn and dusk. In captivity, some of them spend all the daylight hours in their hides so the lights don't do much good. Zoomed does make some compact fluorescents that are full spectrum UV, you just have to check the box, but if you supplement properly you don't really need the lights. If you do choose to use one, get a simple timer and you won't have to remember to turn the lights on and off. Hopefully the 70-73 degree hot zone is air temperature measurement. The floor should be in the low 90's and needs to be checked with a thermometer with a probe. This is why most people put the heat under the bottom of the enclosure.

Aliza
Do you use the powder supplement? I am looking at "Zoo Med Reptivite, with Vitamin D3, 2-Ounce". I just dust this on their worms, right? Do you give it daily?
 

geckomindy

New Member
Messages
6
Generally leopard geckos are provided with their calcium needs through supplements --calcium and vitamin D3. In the wild, they are crepuscular, which means they tend to come out and bask at dawn and dusk. In captivity, some of them spend all the daylight hours in their hides so the lights don't do much good. Zoomed does make some compact fluorescents that are full spectrum UV, you just have to check the box, but if you supplement properly you don't really need the lights. If you do choose to use one, get a simple timer and you won't have to remember to turn the lights on and off. Hopefully the 70-73 degree hot zone is air temperature measurement. The floor should be in the low 90's and needs to be checked with a thermometer with a probe. This is why most people put the heat under the bottom of the enclosure.

Aliza
I was just scared to put the heater on the bottom of the enclosure because I don't want it to burn through the wooden stand it is sitting on, any recommendations?
 

geckomindy

New Member
Messages
6
Ok great, Indyana, do you use a timer? If so what times do you turn on and off the light?
How many hours do you leave on the Exo Terra
There are not UV bulbs that don't also produce visible light at this point, so Aliza's rec for a timer is spot on. I personally use Exo Terra UVB 100 13 W bulbs, just about the lowest level you can find that's still useful, and my geckos love to bask at dawn and dusk.

The only UVB bulbs that also produce heat are very powerful and bright sun bulbs, not suitable for leopard geckos in most enclosures.
How many hours a day do you leave on the Exo Terra UVB? Maybe I could get a double light lamp and a outlet with a timer and leave on the UVB for a certain amount of time and then a heat bulb on 24/7. Does that seem like a good idea?
 

indyana

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,317
Location
Massachusetts, United States
As for the heat bulb, it isn't needed at night if you have a heat mat on a thermostat. For leopard geckos, you generally install on the bottom of the cage. They usually come with little rubber risers to stick on cage corners to make a tiny gap, but if yours didn't, you can use something like those sticky felt discs for the bottoms of chair legs to raise the bottom a tiny bit.

Installing a thermostat with a probe will keep the mat from getting too hot. As Aliza mentioned, you want a floor spot your gecko can lie on that's 88-92 F as measured by a temp probe laid down flat on the floor or with a reptile temp gun.

I believe ZooMed Reptivite is 2-3 times per week only. For any supplement, follow instructions for that particular brand, as they are all different.
 
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