New eggs.

Jh0426

New Member
Messages
5
Hello. I am new to this. My female just laid 2 eggs. I bought a small incubator, but the eggs are still denting. What can I do?
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
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12,828
Location
Somerville, MA
If you have the incubator at an appropriate temperature with a decent thermostat, and you have the eggs in a container with moist substrate and a secure lid with no holes in it, you've probably done just about everything you can do. If this is the female's first clutch, they may not be fertile but she may lay every 2 weeks. If she hasn't been with a male (which I don't think is the case since you got an incubator), then obviously the eggs won't be fertile. I've experienced everything with leopard geckos from females who laid 100% fertile eggs, to females who laid a few dud clutches before getting it together to females who were unsuccessful at producing fertile eggs even after several years of trying.

Aliza
 

Jh0426

New Member
Messages
5
If you have the incubator at an appropriate temperature with a decent thermostat, and you have the eggs in a container with moist substrate and a secure lid with no holes in it, you've probably done just about everything you can do. If this is the female's first clutch, they may not be fertile but she may lay every 2 weeks. If she hasn't been with a male (which I don't think is the case since you got an incubator), then obviously the eggs won't be fertile. I've experienced everything with leopard geckos from females who laid 100% fertile eggs, to females who laid a few dud clutches before getting it together to females who were unsuccessful at producing fertile eggs even after several years of trying.

Aliza
Thanks. She has been with a male. Should I keep them together? I have them separate at the time being. What is the best way for me to heat the eggs without an incubator? Sorry very new at this.
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
12,828
Location
Somerville, MA
Some people only put the male and female together to breed. When I was breeding I kept my males with their females for the whole season. Either can work. If you have a place in the house where you can guarantee a steady temperature somewhere between 81-88F you can put the eggs there. Some people have experimented with incubating the eggs in the gecko cage by putting the egg container on the hot side. There are also DIY incubators online. The problem is that if there is too much of a temperature fluctuation the hatchlings can have deformities, usually small or missing eyelids. Consider getting a Zoomed Reptibator. It's very much like the classic beginner incubator, the Hovobator. The Hovobator is about a third the price, but then you have to spend the money you "saved" getting a better thermostat for it. The Reptibator has a good thermostat.

Aliza
(you may have figured this out already, but it's best to know where and how you're going to incubate the eggs and house the offspring before you put the male with the female)
 
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