Newbie questions

Jackdarlow1996

New Member
Messages
3
Hello!

I've been looking at getting a reptile for a few months now and a gecko is something I'm considering, I have a few questions:

I'd prefer to not feed live bugs as I don't drive and I'd struggle to get to the pet shop often to purchase them. I've read a lot about a powder mix to mix with water as a diet. Is this something they can solely live on or do they require a few bugs every once in a while or does this depend on the type of gecko?

As they're small, I'd consider getting two and putting them in the same vivarium. Is this something that is recommended so they have company or would it be too much for a first time reptile owner?

I've watched a lot of videos where the geckos are still or slowly moving, from their size I'd expect them to be very fast and dart around. Do they dart when they are scared and are usually quite lathergic when they're calm?

I'm sure I'll have more questions in the future but for now I want to make sure they are the right choice before I start doing more research.

Thank you!

Jack
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
13,010
Location
Somerville, MA
Based on what you want to feed, your best bet is to get a crested gecko or a gargoyle gecko (google for their care). They primarily eat the powdered food, generally called "CGD" (Crested Gecko Diet-- though gargoyles and other gecko species eat it too). Some of the CGD has powdered insects mixed in, so it's good for juveniles that need more protein. These geckos aren't social and, while they can live in small groups sometimes, 2 males can't live together and a male and a female will cause you other problems. One adult crested gecko usually requires an 18x18x18" or 18x18x24" cage, so it's probably best to get one. These geckos are nocturnal so they aren't moving much during the day (they have no eyelids, so they may seem to be staring but they're asleep). The crested geckos, especially, are good at jumping. They're fast but not excessively so.

Aliza
 

Jackdarlow1996

New Member
Messages
3
Hi Aliza,

Thank you for your information. I've carried out a lot more research and I think I've settle of a gargoyle. My local reptile centre sell a full package for crested/gargoyle geckos, the only thing is some people said no UVB and others say it's recommended. Some say no extra heating and others say they require a lamp and some say lamp and a mat. I guess this is more down to where you live, with the fluctuating weather of the UK I guess heat lamps and a thermostat are strongly recommended just in case it gets really cold.

The only other thing I've looked into is bioactive setups which I think I might go for, unless these arent recommended for a beginner?

Thank you

Jack

Based on what you want to feed, your best bet is to get a crested gecko or a gargoyle gecko (google for their care). They primarily eat the powdered food, generally called "CGD" (Crested Gecko Diet-- though gargoyles and other gecko species eat it too). Some of the CGD has powdered insects mixed in, so it's good for juveniles that need more protein. These geckos aren't social and, while they can live in small groups sometimes, 2 males can't live together and a male and a female will cause you other problems. One adult crested gecko usually requires an 18x18x18" or 18x18x24" cage, so it's probably best to get one. These geckos are nocturnal so they aren't moving much during the day (they have no eyelids, so they may seem to be staring but they're asleep). The crested geckos, especially, are good at jumping. They're fast but not excessively so.

Aliza
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
13,010
Location
Somerville, MA
There's more than 1 way to do things and here's my take:
--gargoyles are nocturnal so they don't really need UVB because they will get their calcium and D3 from the CGD. They do tend to be outside of the hides during the day, so if there is UVB they probably benefit from it, but it's not required. If the room they'll be in has ambient light, that's adequate. I do use lights for most of my gargoyle cages that I try to keep planted (they stomp on plants regularly) but I don't worry about whether it's UVB or not (lights lose their UVB power after a certain point and I don't keep changing them)
--In my opinion, if the ambient temperature is comfortable for humans, it's enough for gargoyles. They may slow down a bit in the winter and eat less, but that's OK with me. Similarly, they aren't supposed to do well with temps over about 85. In the winter, my living room may get as low as the mid 60's and in the summer my un-air conditioned living room may get into the 90's. If it were in the 90's every day, it would be a problem, but the geckos and I all do OK. On the hottest days I did put an ice pack in one gargoyle enclosure that seemed to be hotter than the others. I don't use extra heat and use light only for plants. (My weather in New England fluctuates at least as much as Merry Olde . . . )
--It's relatively easy to set up a bioactive enclosure. The only problem is that gargoyles tend to stomp on plants. In my cages they've done best with large pieces of cork bark set up at an angle. I do use coco fiber substrate and have a variety of isopods in there that eat the droppings but plants have not worked out so well.

Aliza
 

Jackdarlow1996

New Member
Messages
3
Hi Aliza,

I've ordered a few bits, I think I'm going to set everything up and leave it for a few weeks without purchasing a gecko just to make sure habitat is at a nice temperature etc and let the isopods settle in and then once it's looking good I'll go looking for one. Thank you so much for your help!

Jack
 
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