4 year old male

Madired

New Member
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10
This is my male leopard gecko. The first pic was taken of him in February and then the last picture is him now. He did seem off for a bit but he seemed to be wanting to mate at that time and now he has slowed down. He has lost weight and his yellow has gone away. He’s pooping fine but eating less. He has an under the tank heating pad as well as just a heat lamp. His tank stays about 85 F and he has a cool/moist hide along with a dry/warm hide. His tank is 10 gallons. He is fully aware and does not seem lethargic or like he’s in any pain. He’s still out a normal amount of time. I am just curious as to why he has started losing weight and his colors aren’t as bright. I know they can stop eating during mating season or if the seasons are changing but he has also been having more trouble shedding. I keep damp moss in his cool hide for him and his substrate is paper towel. Also, I know their colors can change when they shed but this seems like a big color change to me. The nearest vet that will take him is out of state so I have been trying to baby him a lot and see if he gets better on his own. I’ve been cleaning his tank more often so that I don’t have to worry as much about bacteria. All of his food is dusted with calcium and vitamins. He is the only gecko in the tank. He’s the second leopard gecko I have had and I have never had problem like this with my other. Please give me any advice you can. :) thank you.
 

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acpart

Geck-cessories
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Somerville, MA
I agree that he doesn't look as good in the first picture as the second picture. Is that 85 degrees in the air or on the ground? If it's in the air that's pretty hot for a small gecko cage and he may be getting dehydrated. Otherwise, since a vet isn't available (and we are not vets, and even if we were, we wouldn't diagnose without seeing the animal), about the only thing you can do is to try to hand feed and see how he does.

Aliza
 

Madired

New Member
Messages
10
I agree that he doesn't look as good in the first picture as the second picture. Is that 85 degrees in the air or on the ground? If it's in the air that's pretty hot for a small gecko cage and he may be getting dehydrated. Otherwise, since a vet isn't available (and we are not vets, and even if we were, we wouldn't diagnose without seeing the animal), about the only thing you can do is to try to hand feed and see how he does.

Aliza
It’s 85 in the air. He seems to be drinking and going to the bathroom fine. I think I’ll try keeping it cooler though to see if maybe he is getting too hot. I’ve always thought their tanks were supposed to be 76-85 during the day. Do you have a good temperature to suggest for a 10 gallon? Thank you for the advice.
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
Messages
11,268
Location
Somerville, MA
I know he's been in the 10 gallon for a long time, but it's kind of difficult to provide a good temperature gradient in a 10 gallon. He may be happier in a 20 gallon long. How are you heating the cage? If you're using an under tank heater and the air temp is 85, the floor temp may be a lot higher. My geckos' enclosures are the same as the ambient temperatures in the house. That means that in the winter it's probably in the high 60's and in the summer may get into the 90's (I have no AC) but it's not that hot every day. A small space like a 10 gallon that's 85 degrees could dehydrate the gecko even if it drinks a lot of water. I have found that sometimes a gecko can do "OK" in a sub-ideal space for a certain amount of time until the non-idealess of the space begins to take a toll. I'm not saying that's what's happening with your gecko, but it is worth checking out. Also check out the floor temps on the hot side.

Aliza
 

Madired

New Member
Messages
10
I know he's been in the 10 gallon for a long time, but it's kind of difficult to provide a good temperature gradient in a 10 gallon. He may be happier in a 20 gallon long. How are you heating the cage? If you're using an under tank heater and the air temp is 85, the floor temp may be a lot higher. My geckos' enclosures are the same as the ambient temperatures in the house. That means that in the winter it's probably in the high 60's and in the summer may get into the 90's (I have no AC) but it's not that hot every day. A small space like a 10 gallon that's 85 degrees could dehydrate the gecko even if it drinks a lot of water. I have found that sometimes a gecko can do "OK" in a sub-ideal space for a certain amount of time until the non-idealess of the space begins to take a toll. I'm not saying that's what's happening with your gecko, but it is worth checking out. Also check out the floor temps on the hot side.

Aliza
Thank you! I have put him in a 20 gallon now. I think it was time to upgrade the size. Now he should have a larger temperature gradient between the warm and cool side. He seems to be liking it. He’s been out venturing around ever since we put him in it. If he does not begin looking better soon I will have to make a trip to the closest vet that will look at him. I am hoping the change of temperature, scenery, and more space will help him.
 
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